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This is today’s propaganda.Militias on the rise

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  • This is today’s propaganda.Militias on the rise

    This is today’s propaganda. Anything that they don’t agree with is a conspiracy theory. And of course this is from ABC News.
    Officials See Rise in Militia Groups Across US
    Report: Officials see rise in militia groups across the country, similar to the '90s movement
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/wireStory?id=8307935
    By EILEEN SULLIVAN Associated Press Writer
    WASHINGTON August 12, 2009 (AP)
    Militia groups with gripes against the government are regrouping across the country and could grow rapidly, according to an organization that tracks such trends.
    The stress of a poor economy and a liberal administration led by a black president are among the causes for the recent rise, the report from the Southern Poverty Law Center says. Conspiracy theories about a secret Mexican plan to reclaim the Southwest are also growing amid the public debate about illegal immigration.
    Bart McEntire, a special agent with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, told SPLC researchers that this is the most growth he's seen in more than a decade.
    "All it's lacking is a spark," McEntire said in the report.
    It's reminiscent of what was seen in the 1990s — right-wing militias, people ideologically against paying taxes and so-called "sovereign citizens" are popping up in large numbers, according to the report to be released Wednesday. The SPLC is a nonprofit civil rights group that, among other activities, investigates hate groups.
    Last October, someone from the Ohio Militia posted a recruiting video on YouTube, billed as a "wake-up call" for America. It's been viewed more than 60,000 times.
    "Things are bad, things are real bad, and it's going to be a lot worse," said the man on the video, who did not give his name. "Our country is in peril."

    The man is holding an AR-15 semiautomatic rifle, and he encourages viewers to buy one.
    While anti-government sentiment has been on the rise over the last two years, there aren't as many threats and violent acts at this point as there were in the 1990s, according to the report. That movement bore the likes of Timothy McVeigh, who in 1995 blew up a federal building in Oklahoma City and killed 168 people.
    But McEntire fears it's only a matter of time.
    These militias are concentrated in the Midwest, Pacific Northwest and the Deep South, according to Mark Potok, an SPLC staff director who co-wrote the report. Recruiting videos and other outreach on the Internet are on the rise, he said, and researchers from his center found at least 50 new groups in the last few months.
    The militia movement of the 1990s gained traction with growing concerns about gun control, environmental laws and anything perceived as liberal government meddling.
    The spark for that movement came in 1992 with an FBI standoff with white separatist Randall Weaver at Ruby Ridge, Idaho. Weaver's wife and son were killed by an FBI sniper. And in 1993, a 52-day standoff between federal agents and the Branch Davidian cult in Waco, Texas, resulted in nearly 80 deaths. These events rallied more people who became convinced that the government would murder its own citizens to promote its liberal agenda.
    Now officials are seeing a new generation of activists, according to the report. The law center spotlights Edward Koernke, a Michigan man who hosts an Internet radio show about militias. His father, Mark, was a major figure in the 1990s militia movement and served six years in prison for charges including assaulting police.

    Last year, officials warned about an increase in activity from militias in a five-year threat projection by the Homeland Security Department.
    "White supremacists and militias are more violent and thus more likely to conduct mass-casualty attacks on the scale of the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing," the threat projection said.
    A series of domestic terrorism incidents over the past year have not been directly tied to organized militias, but the rhetoric behind some of the crimes are similar with that of the militia movement. For instance, the man charged with the April killings of three Pittsburgh police officers posted some of his views online. Richard Andrew Poplawski wrote that U.S. troops could be used against American citizens, and he thinks a gun ban could be coming.
    The FBI's assistant director for counterterrorism, Michael Heimbach, said that law enforcement officials need to identify people who go beyond hateful rhetoric and decide to commit violent acts and crimes. Heimbach said one of the bigger challenges is identifying the lone-wolf offenders.
    One alleged example of a lone-wolf offender is the 88-year-old man charged in the June shooting death of a guard at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington.
    ———
    On the Net:
    Southern Poverty Law Center: http://www.splcenter.org/

  • #2
    I read an article in the paper last week about white supremacists in the Inland empire. While I believe much of it was factual, it seemed to suggest that anyone who disapproved of illegal aliens in any manner was a white supremacist.

    Conspiracy theories about a secret Mexican plan to reclaim the Southwest are also growing amid the public debate about illegal immigration.
    It's not a theory nor is it secret. All one has to do is read the copyrighted words of prominent "Latino activists" and there will be no doubt. In fact, I used to believe that the notion of of the southwest either becoming Aztlan or being annexed by Mexico was white supremacist propaganda until I read it straight from the brown racist's own works.

    Mark Potok, an SPLC staff director...
    The SPLC is noteable for who it doesn't categorize as a racist individual or organization. A brown racist can rant all year long about having to get rid of the white man, but if a white person makes a public statement about ending immigration due to population sustainabilty concerns Potok and co. ignores the first and lists the second.

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    • #3
      Go to a protest and listen to them tell you to go to Europe tell the Blacks to go back to Africa. Listen to their favorite " Ha ha "This is Mexico". It is loud and clear.

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      • #4
        This is one of the great progress that we achieved through our street protests. We exposed the truth and exactly what the tan clan's goals are. Anyone who was paying even the slightest bit of attention saw that this bs of Atzlan is not a bogus conspiracy, the tan clan actually believe it and are working hard to get it.

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        • #5
          I don't see it out here on the West Coast, but my youngest son and his family just moved back from Missouri, and he tells me that militia groups are all over the South, and that they are hooked up with the north and northeast
          organization
          but people better remember what happened to the militia groups 20 years ago ???? And what tore them apart ????
          It's pretty easy to talk about things, but a lot harder to plan and to do what needs to be done
          thank about Utah, Texas, then Oklahoma City ??????

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          • #6
            The Ku Klux TAN are among the WORST racists!

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